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» Flute Karaoke?

MonoLoco   


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Post #1

Hi, all.

I've seen a few YouTube videos of folks "covering" professional artists' flute music whereby they appear to be using the original recording sans the original flute component (track?) ... sort of like an OEM backing track, or perhaps more accurately, like a Karaoke ... an instrumental Karaoke instead of a vocal one.

I would like to be able to do this, but it doesn't seem proper (legal?) to do it if it is done by simply having the original artists' recording edited, either at home, or by a 3rd party, to remove the original flute. If I had such "flute-less" professional recordings, I would play them at the local events I do - granted, I volunteer at these events and play to share, not profit, so I wouldn't be using such "OEM backing tracks" to record and sell my "play-alongs".

Does anyone know the "rules" concerning this issue? I have purchased the original CDs, so perhaps I do have the legal right to edit them for my own personal use ... which might extend to public sharing so long as I am not selling. (?)

I am tempted to contact the orignal artists and ask if they offer their music for sale without the actual flute track - I would buy it! Perhaps some artists already do offer such a thing!

Please share your thoughts on this, and especially any experiences. Do you think professional flute recording artists would be up for (down with!) selling their music for "Karaoke-type" use ? Is this something that is commonly done ... or never done ... or ... ?????????

Thanks,
Scott


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #2

I think you are talking about backing tracks.........which are actually sold to others for their own use with their own music. That's totally legal to use. Removing the flute track from songs, without the permission of the artists, would not be legal, no. Unfortunately, many people don't care what is legal or proper.

So, if you purchase backing tracks, which are sold for that purpose, they are legal to use. If not, then no, you can't really alter other people's music for your own purposes.


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MonoLoco   


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Post #3

Thanks, Rick.

When I think of "backing tracks", I think of generic, flowing background accompaniment stuff to improvise along with ... like Clint Goss's "Jam Tracks"
I guess I didn't consider the actual recordings of complete songs to be "backing tracks" once the flute (or vocals) was removed ... but, of course, they become so!

I wonder if artists are reluctant to sell their backing tracks? Again, I would be happy to purchase them ... with no intention of using them in recordings, just live-playing.


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #4

Most backing tracks sold, are created specifically for that purpose. The players then create their songs to fit with the backing tracks........which allows for a great deal of variation, from one player to another.

Backing tracks for recording artists, are subject to the copyright laws, as the players may have created their own backing tracks, which are totally copyrighted material, or they may have hired or invited other musicians to perform with them, which could be even more complicated, in who has what rights.

For the average player, you can best avoid legal pitfalls by only using backing tracks you have purchased, or by creating them yourself, either digitally, or with other musicians, with whom you have worked out the rights issues.

As someone who has seen all kinds of copyright violations over the years, I really wish people would show more respect to the creative people, who are entitled to the copyrights of their original works, without folks trying to take it for themselves, without any compensation to the copyright owner. This problem was only exacerbated, by the digital age, from the analog age.


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