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» Coyote Oldman Flute Care

Jeremy in SC   


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Post #1

A couple of weeks ago I started a topic asking for your opinions on the value of Coyote Oldman NASFs. Your comments were all positive. After talking with my wife (translation: getting her permission) I bit the bullet/broke the bank and purchased one.

A couple of observations and then some questions. The workmanship and detail carving is impressive and beautiful. Forging his work would be nearly impossible. The sound of the flute is a little breathy compared to some of my other flutes, but in a pleasing way. The additional hole in the back is rather interesting. I am still learning its nuances. For those of a musical theory bend, most of my NASF/NAFs will play three notes in the second octave taking the range up a step and a half beyond the main octave (a few flutes reach 4 notes going up 2 steps). This flute will play 8 notes in the second octave taking it up 4.5 steps. It is going to take me a while to memorize the new fingering pattern and master integrating the two octaves.

Now, a couple of questions. I am accustomed to removing the block/bird when my flutes wet out, or when I am finished playing. This flute came with the block and spacer securely knotted on. I'm curious to ask of other MGA flute owners, have you untied that knot? If so, do you find it difficult to replace the block and spacer?

Thanks for the input.

Peace,
Jeremy


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Northern Lights   


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Post #2

Mine are tied but not knotted. Perhaps the prior owner didnít remove the block at all. Removing the block is a good idea but I confess that I donít usually do it these days. I do blow the flute out to remove excess moisture and shake it out as well. I used to when I first got them but getting everything repositioned took too much time. Iím not sure exactly when but Michael told me he started using a marine grade sealer so later flutes are sealed very well against moisture. With the thumb hole it sounds like your flute may be a diatonic scale. The thumb hole does give you extra notes. Have fun with it!!!! Post pics too!!! Stephen.

This post has been edited by Northern Lights: Sep 19 2017, 05:56 PM


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rocksncactus   


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Post #3

Yeah, the thumb hole sounds like a diatonic. Michael doesn't make many of those. Regardless, all his flutes are excellent. I agree with Stephen. Michael told me he rarely takes a block off his flutes. Also, as far as care and maintenance, his flutes are totally sealed. Per Michael, there is no need to use oil inside or out.

As they say on the camping forums, "Pictures, or it didn't happen!" We need photographic evidence of your new treasure! What key is it?

Love the talking with your wife!

Lizabeth


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #4

Thumb hole flutes are not common in NAF, but several makers do make them. MGA makes diatonic 8 holes, with one being a thumb hole, that are very capable flutes.

You will likely enjoy your flute, more, as you get more familiar with it. Some of his flutes, that are especially capable, require getting familiar with the fingering, as they are not really "standard". Not a problem for those with a good ear, who can sort out the fingering pattern, on their own.

MGA is not the only one doing those sorts of flutes, but his are always reliable, for the more experienced player.


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Utah Chris   


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Post #5

Because the flute is so well finished and sealed, I seldom take the spacer out but I do move the block around a bit after playing. To do this I take any knots out of the straps and tie the block with a "loose" tie. You may find that the spacer discolors after a while so it's good to remove it for the flute's semi-annual cleaning and to brighten up the brass with metal polish.

QUOTE(rocksncactus @ Sep 19 2017, 07:20 PM) *
Yeah, the thumb hole sounds like a diatonic. Michael doesn't make many of those. Regardless, all his flutes are excellent. I agree with Stephen. Michael told me he rarely takes a block off his flutes. Also, as far as care and maintenance, his flutes are totally sealed. Per Michael, there is no need to use oil inside or out.

As they say on the camping forums, "Pictures, or it didn't happen!" We need photographic evidence of your new treasure! What key is it?

Love the talking with your wife!

Lizabeth



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Northern Lights   


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Post #6

One other thought, any air leaks on the thumb hole will not be excused -- another trait of Michael's flutes, so make sure you have good coverage on that hole. At least for me, that was one bit of a "learning curve" issue with my MGA diatonic. The flutes are very sensitive to air pressure (this is a very good thing), but it can be a bit frustrating at first. You will find all kinds of interesting ways to use this trait in your playing. This is one of the things I value most about MGA's NAF's. Stephen.


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Jeremy in SC   


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Post #7

Thanks for all the advice. I have attached proof. As you can see it is an "A" from 2007.

So far my biggest problem with the thumb hole is remembering to cover it! It is not exactly where I normally place my thumb for gripping purposes, so when I first pick it up I have to make sure to place that thumb correctly. The flute does produce sound with very little breath effort. Still mastering.

Someone mentioned MGA doesn't make very many diatonics...any idea how rare they are?

Jeremy
Attached File(s)
Attached File  20170920_155059.jpg ( 4.12MB ) Number of downloads: 13
Attached File  20170920_155318.jpg ( 2.85MB ) Number of downloads: 8
Attached File  20170920_155341.jpg ( 2.74MB ) Number of downloads: 8
 


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salsadj   


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Post #8

I have two flutes from him. If it sounds breathy you may need to adjust the brass spacer. I have one I bought in 1996 and for years it sounded breathy. One day I took apart the bird, moved the spacer closer the the sound hole and man what a difference. Enjoy your new treasure.

Rod


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #9

Your flute is one from the original batch of A diatonic flutes, I suspect. That date was about the first time I had seen them, and my own is from that same time frame.

I do not know how many diatonics MGA has made over the years. However, I know he worked with Doc Payne for decades, and Doc Payne was very much into diatonic tuning, so I have to suspect that MGA has made them from time to time.

The plate and block are not hard to remove and replace, on the flute. You have to look at how the flute is made, and recognize that the placement of the plate, is simply putting the splitting edge where it should be, if the plate were not used, in position on the TSH. Then place the block in position as though the plate were not being used as well. The plate is a spacer for the flue.........and the position of the splitting edge, and the block should be "normal" as for a flute without the spacer. Slight adjustments can be made once they are again in place on the flute. The biggest issue, is to keep the block and spacer plate where they will not get misplaced, or lost, while off the flute.

Flutes with thumb holes usually call for placing the thumb upward, on the back of the flute. If you practice doing that, you should get comfortable with it, pretty fast. You want to be able to crack the thumb hole easily, while playing, in a similar manner to overblowing by cracking the top hole of a flute. That control is best achieved with the thumb pointed upward, while playing.






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Northern Lights   


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Post #10

To add to Rick's post, once you get the "basic" plate/block placement and are comfortable with that, experiment with moving them around a bit - both of them. You will be able to modify the sound a lot and may find a placement that really does it for you. This is something you really can't replicate on a non-spacer flute (at least not to the same degree). Stephen.


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Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 25th September 2017 - 01:50 AM