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» Interactive Tab For Easy Learning. Thoughts?, In the process of designing my own flute tab

ponder   


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Post #1

As someone who struggles with dyslexia and various other cognitive issues, I thought I would design my own interactive tab. I'm curious as to what others think of what I have come up with so far. I started watching people on YouTube and not being able to find tab for some of the exercises, I decided to write down my own tab from watching the player.

I have only done this once thus far. I downloaded the video and then cut the piece into sections. I then watched and mirrored the performer using pause and frame by frame button when I needed. Once transcribed I then practiced more by repeating the sections with the video cuts on playback. I then finally decided to work out how to make an animated object follow the tab using video editing software.

I'm really stoked with the results. Yes ... the process is quite laborious ... BUT ... I have to say by the end of it all I can pretty much play the music I am learning back to front. I'm always seeing a lot of comments on YouTube ... "Where is the Tab?"

I'm curious if anyone can else can follow the layout of Interactive Tab I just made up?

Is it simple enough for others like myself with various cognitive issues? Perhaps I am the only one that struggles learning music?

Interactive Flute (NAF) Tab Example


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #2

If it works for you, then by all means use it. I have a short cut tab method I use, which is not complicated, but works for me. I put more emphasis on duration of the notes, rather than blowing methods, though.


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rocksncactus   


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Post #3

Ponder,

Scott August has a very interesting method he's devised called number tab. I attended his workshop on it at Native Rhythms last week. It's basically shorthand for NAF and makes a lot of sense. It works very well for folks who don't read music. I personally witnessed a tent full of people, most of whom professed not to read music, go through the workshop and start playing using number tab. It's like anything else, has a small learning curve, but it's very easy to understand and implement. I believe just about ANYONE can use it.

Its best use, as described by Scott, is this scenario: You are playing and spontaneously come up with a little tune or a line or three that you really like. You want to remember it so you can keep playing it or even expand on it as time goes on. Sitting down and drawing the flute shapes and coloring in the finger holes as you do in finger tab is cumbersome and time-consuming. With number tab all you have to do, at its simplest, is write down the numbers. Voila! You've got a notation that you can go back to the next day or a month later and still be able to play. It's pretty cool. In later stages you can make indications for how long to hold notes, etc.

Check it out in the links.

Lizabeth

http://cedarmesa.com/blogfiles/numbertab.html

http://cedarmesa.com/blogfiles/numbertab/numbertab2.html



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Joe D   


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Post #4

Ponder,

Here is how I write my music: I transpose existing music to the key of E which I am calling the bottom line of the 5 lined music thing. This will show me if the song is playable on the NAF and therefore playable for me on other flutes. The positions of the other notes with respect to E (root note) all have the same fingerings.

Here is an example that got me started along with John Vame's numbering.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uri77mLUCo4

What you are proposing is fine and requires being able to see the fingerings. I use visible fingerings to write songs when I can not locate any sheet music.

This post has been edited by Joe D: Nov 19 2017, 06:46 PM


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MonoLoco   


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Post #5

Ponder,

You are certainly NOT the only one struggles learning music. Luckily, I have a good ear because I can't read sheet music. When I try to learn how to read sheet music, it always ends up getting scrambled in my head. The staff lines (if that's what they're called?) actually appear to move and I lose focus - it's a visual handicap of some sort I guess ... perhaps some type of dyslexia, though I don't have problems, in general, with reading (although I often will reverse numbers when I go to write them down after I verbalize them - for example, I'll say "5-2-1" but write down 5-1-2. I have no idea what any of that means! blink.gif
Everyone's brain works (or doesn't work!) differently. I, for instance, prefer to see the flute images with the mouthpiece DOWN, at the bottom ... it feels more natural, and better matches the actual orientation of my flute when I am holding the flute extended out horizontally and have the tab sheet lying flat on the coffee table. I suppose that if I had the paper standing up on a music stand, and held my flute vertically, then I would prefer the images with the mouthpiece UP.
Also, for me, your use of different sized flute images makes me have to shift my eyes too much ... it's too distracting for me as my brain has to zoom in and out at the same time as moving left to right. And, while the bouncing ball is neat, the fact that it goes up and down to match the different-sized flutes is over-stimulating for my brain ... I got a bit overwhelmed by it all. And so, for me, it doesn't work. It is cool, though ... the end result looks quite polished. I'm glad it works well for you - that's what counts most.

Like the Scott August TAB system that Lizabeth mentioned, I sometimes use a simple number system to denote different fingerings. It's good for jotting down notes for original songs, or for "grabbing" someone else's tune - but, for playing the tune later, after writing it down, I think transposing it to a "flute image picture font" TAB would be best. Attached is a PDF of my simple system, for reference. It is basically the same concept as the link that Joe D shared.
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Simple_TAB.pdf ( 225.06K ) Number of downloads: 16
 


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Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 12th December 2017 - 01:58 AM