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» Native American Movies?

MonoLoco   


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Post #1

Hi, all:

I am currently enjoying an Amazon Prime membership trial and I see that there are several Native American-themed titles available. I might revisit some favorites, like A Man Called Horse, Little Big Man, and Smoke Signals. I am creating a "Watch List" of new (to me) titles. In my watch list thus far, I have:

1) Generation Red Nation - Russel Means
"Generation Red Nation gives a brutally honest view of life on Indian reservations, leaving the Reservation, and city life.

2)Indian by Birth
"Stripped of their heritage language generations ago, the Lumbee indians of Southeastern North Carolina carved out a unique dialect of English that has helped maintain their distinctive cultural identity. The story of Lumbee English is one of the most remarkable narratives of linguistic adaptability and cultural perseverance ever documented in the history of American English dialects. "

3) Ishi - The Last Yahi
As an archery fan, I've read a little about him from his friendship with famed archers Pope and Young ... the film should be interesting

4) Sitting Bull: A Stone in my Heart
"Sitting Bull's own words, over six-hundred photographs and a compelling original music score bring to life this great American Indian's struggle to save his people's way of life against an ever-expanding westward movement of white settlers. This is powerful cinematic journey into the life and spirit of a legendary figure. No other film captures him with such depth of character and personality. " (this is not a freebie, but it sounds good $2.99 rental)

5) A Good Day to Die
"Chronicles a movement that started a revolution and inspired a nation. By recounting the life story of Dennis Banks, the Native American who co-founded the American Indian Movement (AIM) in 1968. "

6) Road to Paloma

Are there some other titles that y'all can recommend?

THANKS!


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Terry B   


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Post #2

Here's a link to what I posted about the "Daughter of dawn" some time ago
http://forums.fluteportal.com/index.php?showtopic=12380


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #3

Depends. You must recognize that no film is a true depiction of actual history, as Hollywood has never made any such film, about anything in history. Even documentary films are also "enhanced" and "embellished" to a point of view. I am always astounded by the people who actually believe, any film they see, is a real depiction of history. Films are entirely pure entertainment, and the film makers start with wanting to influence the viewer, often in entirely the wrong way, and that totally changes the facts of history.

In other words, films are kind of like "fake news".........the viewers are influenced to believe lies, and half-truths about history, in an effort to change how people feel about those topics, rather than to reveal real history. The viewer has to view those films carefully, and recognize what is false and what is not. You can expect more false, than true.

While there are some films that point out some important concepts, almost none are accurate historically. So, go for the concepts, more than historical facts.

One that is more obscure, that offers some insights, is "Last of the Dog Men". "A Man Called Horse", is also worth the time. There are some good points made in "Little Big Man", and "Dances with Wolves". The best of the documentaries, is probably "How the West was Lost". I have not yet viewed "Sacajewa" (I may have misspelled that.). It may have potential.

Some of the more interesting aspects of Native peoples I have seen, are slide shows, by the people who actually went among native peoples, and shared what they found there, like Doc Payne. Those are not manipulated, to tell any particular point of view, or influence your opinion. It is simply one person's experience, shared with imagery.

Real life is not theatrical, at all. It is often quite boring. Realize that while life is primarily a continuing struggle, it is seldom truly dramatic. It is just a continuation of the sequence of struggles that we overcome, on a day to day basis, throughout our lives. Real people, are quite fragile, and easily injured, by conflict. Real people have no superpowers, nor are they capable of "Hollywood" feats. Real people have lots of shortcomings.

So, again, as I said at the beginning..........it simply depends on what you expect to find.


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MonoLoco   


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Post #4

Terry: I do recall (now that you've refreshed my memory, that is!) your original post on the "The Daughter of Dawn". It's not a freebie on Amazon Prime, but available for sale on DVD for about $17. I might have to get it - thanks for the refresh!

Rick: "fake News" ... what a great term. I enjoy these films mainly for entertainment, not education, per se, so I keep things in perspective. After being tricked by The History Channel (or Discovery Channel?) by one of their pseudo-documentaries, I am skeptical about all documentaries now ... so many things casually blend fact and fiction, that everything needs to be questioned and researched in order to validate/confirm content.

As a young boy (age 5 or 6), I remember seeing "A Man Called Horse" and being mesmerized. My mom teases me that she remembers me shouting loudly in the theater "He's NAKED, he's NAKED ..." when the main character was first captured while bathing laugh.gif . As with most films, the sequels did not equal the original. I did enjoy the "Last of the Dogmen", with Tom Berenger ... far-fetched, but cool to consider that it "might" be possible. I own the set of "How the West was Lost", as well as "We Shall Remain" - both good stuff. Thanks, again.


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bonefamily   


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Post #5

Are "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" and "Dances With Wolves" too Hollywood for your liking? I'm not very up to Native American movies, but I always enjoy watching these. I know not very documentary-like, and surely made to entertain the watcher, but I like watching them.


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CindyL   


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Post #6

We volunteer on Pine Ridge for a week most years. Our Lakota friends recommended Smoke Signals, Thunderheart, and Skins.

I also have to say that they said they like to watch old westerns and find their friends in the extras.


CindyL


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Utah Chris   


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Post #7

Two documentary-like movies: Reel Injun, a study of images of Native people in film and other media; and Neither Wolf Nor Dog, a story of a young man accompanying an elder to the All-Tribes Pow wow. The first is well-known; the latter is a bit slow-moving, but very well done.

QUOTE(CindyL @ Jul 21 2017, 02:08 PM) *
We volunteer on Pine Ridge for a week most years. Our Lakota friends recommended Smoke Signals, Thunderheart, and Skins.

I also have to say that they said they like to watch old westerns and find their friends in the extras.
CindyL



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Footmandog   


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Post #8

I really enjoyed "The education of Little Tree."


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rocksncactus   


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Post #9

QUOTE(CindyL @ Jul 21 2017, 02:08 PM) *
We volunteer on Pine Ridge for a week most years. Our Lakota friends recommended Smoke Signals, Thunderheart, and Skins.

I also have to say that they said they like to watch old westerns and find their friends in the extras.
CindyL


That reminds me of something. I love Tony Hillerman's Navajo Nation mystery books and have read them many times. I started reading his first, The Blessing Way, on the way back from a trip out West in 2013, and over the course of the next two weeks I purchased and devoured all the rest of them. They are what put a bug in my brain to get a Native American flute, and for that I will forever love his stories. Anyway, in the one I'm currently rereading, Sacred Clowns, three of the characters go to the drive-in to see Cheyenne Autumn, a John Ford picture. All the Navajos love to see this movie; their relatives played the Cheyenne in the film, and it's great entertainment to watch the movie and laugh. Apparently, the Navajos in the film, since they were speaking Navajo and none of the white people could understand them, were making ribald jokes. Anyway, this is a movie I'd like to see sometime. I've read several places the comment in this article about the turning point for Natives in development of their identity in being able to mock the historical interpretation of Native Americans in film.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheyenne_Autumn


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CindyL   


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Post #10

I have read many of the Hillerman books too, but not that one. I will have to get back into the series.

The Lakota I have met have the driest sense of humor, very funny. We could not go out this summer. I hope we can again next year, although my friend who recommended movies no longer works for the organization we volunteered at, Re-Member. It is the oldest help organization on Pine Ridge. It is not religious; it just helps. If Re-Member has time and materials, they will build those who need it bunkbeds, outhouses, disability ramps, steps, skirt your trailer, etc. They only ask in return is that the owner try to be there to interact with the volunteers to help bridge the cultural gap, i.e. Re-Member if the opposite of dismember. Wonderful organization.

CindyL


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kevin lahue   


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Post #11

There have been some good ones already mentioned, here are a few more plus some documentaries to add to the growing list.

1. Incident at Oglala- Documentary about the Pine Ridge Shootout on an Oglala Sioux reservation in South Dakota. On June 26, 1975,
2. More than frybread - nice mockumentary about a national frybread compititon.
3. Black Robe - In 1634 New France (Quebec), Jesuit Father Laforgue, a young French missionary, is assigned to travel over 1500 miles to the Jesuit mission in a Huron
settlement. Blackrobe, as the Indians call him, is accompanied by eight canoes of Algonquins and young French translator Daniel.
4. Native Clay. Documentary with complete step by step from diging the clay to firing a pot. Very interesting, traditional methods used.
5. World of American Indian Dance - Documentary highlighting the many dance styles of various Native American Tribes and nations.


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shewhoflutesinca...   


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Post #12

QUOTE(kevin lahue @ Jul 30 2017, 08:36 PM) *
There have been some good ones already mentioned, here are a few more plus some documentaries to add to the growing list.

1. Incident at Oglala- Documentary about the Pine Ridge Shootout on an Oglala Sioux reservation in South Dakota. On June 26, 1975,
2. More than frybread - nice mockumentary about a national frybread compititon.
3. Black Robe - In 1634 New France (Quebec), Jesuit Father Laforgue, a young French missionary, is assigned to travel over 1500 miles to the Jesuit mission in a Huron
settlement. Blackrobe, as the Indians call him, is accompanied by eight canoes of Algonquins and young French translator Daniel.
4. Native Clay. Documentary with complete step by step from diging the clay to firing a pot. Very interesting, traditional methods used.
5. World of American Indian Dance - Documentary highlighting the many dance styles of various Native American Tribes and nations.
Black Robe was amazing! I'll definitely have to look up some of these others you've mentioned, Kevin... especially the Native Clay one... sounds fascinating! Thank you.


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CindyL   


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Post #13

https://indiancountrymedianetwork.com/cultu...campaign=buffer


Looks good.


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MonoLoco   


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Post #14

Thanks, everyone, for all the replies. Lots of great movies here - Ive seen most of them but not all ... especially the documentaries, which I've noted for future viewing.

Torture scenes can be harsh, like the clam shell amputation in Black Robe (ouch!), but a movie not mentioned here yet that I thought was also very good has a torture scene, too... in case you can't bear such things. I'm referring to "Cleancut", starring Graham Greene - I can watch him all day ... and listen to his voice. Below is a imdb.com description of Cleancut:

"When a lawyer loses an appeal to stop a logging company from clear-cutting Native American land, Arthur, an Indian militant drags him and the kidnapped logging mill manager into the forest. The lawyer's empty talk about how the company's greed should be punished is put into brutal action by Arthur, who tortures the manager in allegorical ways mimicking what loggers do to the forest."

Another older movie I enjoyed was "The Savage Innocents", with Anthony Quinn as an Eskimo. In fact, the reason I'm posting here again is that I'm home today and as I was flipping through the TV channels for a bit I came upon the move "Buffalo Bill", from 1944. It also stars Anthony Quinn, this time as Chief Yellow Robe. I watched for a few minutes and, while fairly cheesy, it does try to recognize the NAs as noble people trying to defend their way of life ... fighting back instead of just fighting, so to speak. It even refers to the mass slaughter of buffalo, by trains as sport, as an intentional means to take away their sustenance, so there is some effort to keep it real, ... considering its era.


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Nate   


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Post #15

1) Turquoise Rose - Young Navajo girl cancel trip to Europe to take care of her grandma.
2) Black Cloud - Navajo boxer
3) Edge of America - All Native girl basketball team gets a new coach and go for state champion play off.
4) Dreamkeeper - Young boy travels with grandpa to pow wow and hears several traditional stories.
5) Smoke Signals - Young man goes to Phoenix to pick up fathers remains.
6) Pow Wow Highway - Young man travels to Santa Fe to help sister in trouble.
7) Legends from the Sky - Native sci-fi.
8) More than Frybread - Comedy. Frybread making contest.
9) Skinwalkers/ Coyote Waits/ A Thief in Time - (Three movies written by Tony Hillerman) PBS Native mystery novel.

Haven't seen it, but I heard "Wind River" is good. It's currently at theaters.


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