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» Flute Making Forum Guidelines

Even though we encourage members to share their experience in this section, ideally we'd like to keep an "amateur" flavor to it.

If you are a novice flute maker (for example) and are looking for feedback on your first creations, or if you are an experienced professional who is assisting a new maker, that is great.

However, if you are a professional who is selling their work anywhere, then in the interest of maintaining the no selling policy of this site (both in the letter and the spirit of the law) we ask that you do not showcase your work here, even if you are not actively making a sales pitch or linking to your website. You may post technical photos that are illustrative of the principles of flute making, but please refrain from any postings that are solely for the purpose of showcasing your creations.

This will ensure that no one takes undue advantage of the open nature of this forum.

 
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» Wind River Flutes, A nice site

Terry B   


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Post #1

I stumbled across this site and saw a lot of old flutes in the flute gallery. I noticed that there were many old flutes with a very long rectangular wind hole and I was wondering if any flute makers would like to comment on this aspect of old flute making.

I also noticed a lot of metal under the birds and thought you guys could talk about the evolution of the nest and the differences between makers and give a timeline of sorts as to the different developments and styles of nest if you wished.
And if not
There are still a lot of great old flutes to look at just for the fun of it!
Here's the link to the flute page.
http://wind-riverflutes.com/flutes/

Here's the link to the home page
http://wind-riverflutes.com/

The "sounds" page has some very old melodies as well and a lot of warblers warbling away.
See ya!


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shewhoflutesinca...   


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Post #2

QUOTE(Terry B @ Apr 20 2017, 07:11 PM) *
I stumbled across this site and saw a lot of old flutes in the flute gallery. I noticed that there were many old flutes with a very long rectangular wind hole and I was wondering if any flute makers would like to comment on this aspect of old flute making.

I also noticed a lot of metal under the birds and thought you guys could talk about the evolution of the nest and the differences between makers and give a timeline of sorts as to the different developments and styles of nest if you wished.
And if not
There are still a lot of great old flutes to look at just for the fun of it!
Here's the link to the flute page.
http://wind-riverflutes.com/flutes/

Here's the link to the home page
http://wind-riverflutes.com/

The "sounds" page has some very old melodies as well and a lot of warblers warbling away.
See ya!
I love your posts, Terry B smile.gif

Thank you... that's a great site! I looked at the flute gallery first, and was scrolling down, saying to myself "It would be fun to choose a favourite, and ask others which they love best", but it went on scrolling and scrolling! So many flutes! Wonderful!

And I haven't listened to many yet because hubby is watching TV and I snuck only a hint of sound from a couple of tracks, but they sounded interesting! I'd like to play something more along the more traditional style of playing. I still do free form, but I tend to need a riff (??) from somewhere as a launching pad biggrin.gif

Love that site. Thank you! smile.gif


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shewhoflutesinca...   


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Post #3

Moments later... I LOVE these! Thank you. I could turn the volume up enough to hear the songs properly... Hubby heard, too, and as I was saying "I love these" he was saying "Yeah... that's great. That's the style you like biggrin.gif". Thank you so much to Mr. Steve Bliven, who is credited with sourcing the tracks on that site. Yeehah!!! I totally have to learn Cherished Grandmother, given my new status as a grandmother. Seriously, though, thanks Terry B. This is a most delightful find smile.gif biggrin.gif


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #4

I have seen only a few of the "old flutes". Those are hard to date, but most I have seen, are probably first half of the 20th century, which makes them fairly recent, in terms of age. Some of the ones in this listing, seem far older. Of those I have seen, and heard, the tuning is far from consistent, and far from being easy to play well. Most are breathy, or airy, to some extent.

That's about as much as I can share, about the "old" flutes.


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Mark   


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Post #5

I love the old flutes. I have several reproductions of the Kiowa style flute. Regarding that style flute I am referencing the metal fipple shield (usually made of brass or tin). They can sound really smooth but can warble loudly when pushed. I don't imagine that the fipple shield is exclusive to the Kiowa but they are on most of the old Kiowa flutes I have seen. I also like that simple block. Russ Wolf made some nice flutes featuring that block. Leroy Culley also uses that simple block design.

Mark


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MonoLoco   


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Post #6

Awesome link ... thanks, Terry!

I though I found a great source for checking out old flutes when I recently bought a book with pics. of a dozen old flutes from the collection of Thurlow Lieurance ... which came with a CD that demonstrated each flute's voice. However, the link you shared has so many flutes to admire! The book is still cool, though. Many of the flutes have "flowed metal bands"... something I had not seen before. Also, I believe some of the flutes have tone holes that are slanted, not plumb (?) I guess they would be "undercut"by doing this. I don't have the book to confirm, as I have already lent it to a friend, so maybe I'm wrong about what the author calls "slanted holes" - maybe they are simply tapered due to conical burning rods ???? However, I think I recall something about some holes slanting forward. blink.gif

The book is available from the Oregon Flute Store (click on link): Thurlow Lieurance Collection

per the Oregon Flute Store's description ...

"Thurlow Lieurance was one of the first performers to ever use the Native American flute in contemporary music. His well known songs like “By the Waters of Minnetonka”, “Wi-UM”, and “By Singing Waters” were known for his adaptations of traditional indigenous music to the modern stage. He collected several Native American flutes of which 12 have survived the ravages of time and are presented here in this in-depth study by Mrs. Betty Hensley. Mrs. Hensley is an accomplished flutist, having a large collection of world flutes and able to play them all. She brought her knowledge of the wind instrument’s tunings and characteristics to a unique view, found in this book. This new revised edition features the 12 flutes studied as to their history, tunings, tone and unique nature with four pages of color pictures of them. An accompanying CD allows listeners to hear the sounds of the old flutes, and enjoy the melodic works of Lieurance performed by Mrs. Hensley.
Published by the Oregon Flute Store - Edited by Douglas Spotted Eagle.





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Utah Chris   


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Post #7

O. W. Jones, Russ Wolf and Steve Bliven have done a service by locating these materials in one place. Russ Wolf was one of the first (that is, before the collections were easily available on the Internet) to collect pictures of flutes from such sources as the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian. He also authored songbooks and teaching materials for making and playing flutes. Steve Bliven, along with Barry Higgins, created the first catalog of repositories of flutes in museums across the country. I still have my printout of their catalog in my files. O. W. Jones has made his own modern-day versions of historical flutes for many years now. Much of this foundational work along with attributions and locations can be cross referenced now in Flutopedia, and I hope more identifying information will be added to this page in the future. But I see how having the visual and sonic material gathered together on one compact site can be useful for casual enjoyment and education.

I remember a time when Russ Wolf posted regularly to this forum. Golly, I'm starting to feel like an old codger. "Back in my day. . . (cough, cough)."


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #8

Not sure if Russ Wolf is still making flutes. When I left Dallas, he was getting pretty burned out. I have heard little about him, since then. He was a part time maker, so even though I lived 10 minutes from him, he was never easy to get flutes from.


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Utah Chris   


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Post #9

This is what I believe to be my Russ Wolf flute. I think that is his stamp in the back. Hopi style decorations,
plate flue, grandfather tuned. This is easily the first flute visitors are drawn to in my collection. Let me know if
I have the wrong attribution.

Attached File  Russ_Wolf_Hopi_decorated_flute_1.jpg ( 1.21MB ) Number of downloads: 5


Attached File  Russ_Wolf_Hopi_decorated_flute_2.jpg ( 1.15MB ) Number of downloads: 6


Attached File  Russ_Wolf_Hopi_decorated_flute3_stamped.jpg ( 1.18MB ) Number of downloads: 6


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Rick McDaniel   


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Post #10

That is definitely NOT a Russ Wolf flute. Nothing about it has the characteristics of a Russ Wolf flute, except the use of the brass fipple. There once was, unsure if he still makes, a maker in another part of Texas, who called himself Kokopelli Flutes, but this doesn't really resemble that maker's work, either.

The nest and TSH are more unusual on this one, and I can't begin to guess, who might have made this one.

I gave you more info, on the other post, on this, already, regarding why I am certain, it isn't made by Russ Wolf.


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Terry B   


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Post #11

Well thanks guys for all the comments......I learned a bit of something along the way. Keep it up!


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Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st November 2017 - 11:13 AM