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» Lost Tuning Flute Discussion

Carlton   


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Post #1

Hey all! Recently a very cool event took place. One evening I went to visit my sister and brother-in-law. As he is a flute player, I am always bringing over some flutes to show and play with him. This evening I happened to take a flute that I had made and found he took a keen interest to it and even offered to buy it. Well, I have a thing about selling to relatives and decided that I would just gift it to him instead...but later. So, after a few days I met with him and gifted him the flute (along with a couple of others I don't play often). At the time we were out in his shop and he said wait a moment..I'll be right back. He was gone a few minutes and came back with something and handed it to me...a Scott August "Lost Tuning Flute"!!! I really could not believe he did this! I'll have to say this is one of the most beautiful flutes I have ever held. OK...now, I would like to find out as much about this flute as possible. Why is it called Lost Tuning? What was the inspiration to create it? What are some tips to play it? I can play it, but wow...its going to take much practice to play it properly.


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Geoffrey   


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Post #2

QUOTE(Carlton @ Apr 13 2012, 07:20 AM) *
Hey all! Recently a very cool event took place. One evening I went to visit my sister and brother-in-law. As he is a flute player, I am always bringing over some flutes to show and play with him. This evening I happened to take a flute that I had made and found he took a keen interest to it and even offered to buy it. Well, I have a thing about selling to relatives and decided that I would just gift it to him instead...but later. So, after a few days I met with him and gifted him the flute (along with a couple of others I don't play often). At the time we were out in his shop and he said wait a moment..I'll be right back. He was gone a few minutes and came back with something and handed it to me...a Scott August "Lost Tuning Flute"!!! I really could not believe he did this! I'll have to say this is one of the most beautiful flutes I have ever held. OK...now, I would like to find out as much about this flute as possible. Why is it called Lost Tuning? What was the inspiration to create it? What are some tips to play it? I can play it, but wow...its going to take much practice to play it properly.


Hi Carlton,

I made the Lost Tuning Flute in 2010 as the Scott August signature flute for that year. Scott called it the Lost Tuning because of the scale (like the tuning of a pentatonic NAF only with the 2nd included). I'll send you a PM with the fingering chart.


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LVG33k   


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Post #3

Hi Geoffrey, we spoke on the phone yesterday. Is the lost tuning fingering much different from a "typical" Anasazi?


QUOTE(Geoffrey @ Apr 13 2012, 06:38 AM) *
Hi Carlton,

I made the Lost Tuning Flute in 2010 as the Scott August signature flute for that year. Scott called it the Lost Tuning because of the scale (like the tuning of a pentatonic NAF only with the 2nd included). I'll send you a PM with the fingering chart.


This post has been edited by LVG33k: Apr 13 2012, 08:52 AM


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ChrisK   


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Post #4

I love the Lost Tuning flute. It is one of my most versatile flutes. First off it is in C, a nice mellow tone. And it has a NAF scale with the addition of the note you have to make on the NAF by half-holing the bottom hole. You can get almost all the alternately fingered notes you get on the NAF. Not all, but most. And you get a complete second octave, which extends the range by 75% and opens up all kinds of music.

It is such a light flute with really thin walls. The reach can be hard for some. I can do it with my finger pads, but I have a friend who has to use a piper's grip.

I can't tell you how significant that extra note is. No half-holing Amazing Grace, for instance. It lends either a mysterious feel or a jazzy feel to the music, IMO.

It isn't like an Anasazi. It is exactly like a Mojave 6, with the exception of one note. On my C Lost Tuning, you get the A note, where on a C Mojave you would get the G# instead. But you can cross finger and get both notes on either flute (correct me if I'm wrong, Geoffrey.)

I took me some time to really be able to play the upper octave. I thought the flute was fussy and problematic. But, I don't think that anymore. Just takes practice.

I think if someone were to make a NAF with the same scale (allowing for that extra note a step up from the fundamental), I think it would be a big hit.




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Jeremy in SC   


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Post #5

QUOTE(ChrisK @ Apr 13 2012, 05:10 PM) *
I love the Lost Tuning flute. It is one of my most versatile flutes.

I think if someone were to make a NAF with the same scale (allowing for that extra note a step up from the fundamental), I think it would be a big hit.


Chris,

Sorry about the delay...was on vacation last week and just had a tablet with me so I could read, but a pain to reply.

When I first read your idea about an alternately tuned NAF, my first thought was "Yeah, that would be great." Then I imagined having one of those flutes, and i realized I probably wouldn't like it. You see, I've been playing about 4.5 years and I have a dozen or so flutes. And for the most part, the fingering on them is pretty much the same. Some are a little different in the second octave, but most are the same. But if I had a flute that had an extra hole, or that the normal 6 holes were tuned differently, then it would really throw me off when I mixed it in with my other flutes. Now, this may be a limitation on my part, but I think others would find a similar experience. When I play a song, I like to be able to play it on all of my flutes and I don't want to have to drastically change my fingering.

Also, what you are really talking about is doing away with the need to half-hole. It took me several months to get reasonably good at half-holing and about a year to master it. Now, I don't even think about it, it just comes naturally. Half-holing is just one of those skills that a good flute player needs to acquire. Let's face it, the NAF is pretty easy to play right off the bat. Learning to half-hole is just "paying our dues."

Now, all of that is not to say that I wouldn't want to hear a flute like the one you describe. I just don't think as a player I would want one. But that could just be laziness on my part, as I wouldn't want to learn the extra fingerings.

Peace,
Jeremy


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Kuz   


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Post #6

In theory, extended range aside, the 'standard' tuned NASF should play all the notes in the chromatic scale so any of the alternate tunings should be available on it. If a player enjoys half, shaded, cross etc. notes in their song then no other tunings are necessary. For me as a player it's way too much thinking.
I don't like thinking when playing, not thinking seems to be something I'm good at.
Over the years I've made flutes in maybe 30-40 different tunings. Each seem to have their own song, given up on it's own. Some I took to most not so much but all were fun. Searching for notes, thinking hard while playing is not all that much fun for me and , Prayers aside, music is for fun, relaxation.
Serious playing is an oxymoron in my opinion wink.gif
Kuz



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Carlton   


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Post #7

Thanks everyone, for the discussiion here...I'm still learning! This flute is a sure challenge, but has an awesome voice.


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super-D   


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Post #8

Nice topic, thx Carlton for this and thank you all for participating!
I have many rimblown flutes and among them i do have lost tunning little blue jewel flute.
Now reading this ,i am playing on it more and more,- any of you more expirience players on this particular flute can post any finger chart for the cross fingering and this extra notes?


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ChrisK   


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Post #9

QUOTE(super-D @ Apr 23 2012, 10:44 AM) *
Nice topic, thx Carlton for this and thank you all for participating!
I have many rimblown flutes and among them i do have lost tunning little blue jewel flute.
Now reading this ,i am playing on it more and more,- any of you more expirience players on this particular flute can post any finger chart for the cross fingering and this extra notes?


The cross fingering is given on Geoffrey's chart that came with the flute, I think. You can half hole the bottom hole to get a C# pretty easily, especially in the upper octave. And you can half hole the fourth hole from the top to get an E. Cross fingering (the rim of the flute being to the left and the foot of the flute being to the right):
XOXXOO = G#, but only in the lower octave; in the upper the same fingering plays a Bb. In case you didn't get Geoffrey's finger chart: OXOOOO = Bb. That's all I know. Any others?


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ChrisK   


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Post #10

Actually, Russ Venable showed me a NA flute he made that had that extra note, of a kind he made for Mary Youngblood who needed it to play a particular song. It was a cool flute and got an extra note in the upper octave --but it had its limitations, as all things do. I am learning to let each flute be what it is, instead of trying to turn the flute into what I want it to be.
QUOTE(Jeremy in SC @ Apr 20 2012, 04:23 AM) *
Chris,

Sorry about the delay...was on vacation last week and just had a tablet with me so I could read, but a pain to reply.

When I first read your idea about an alternately tuned NAF, my first thought was "Yeah, that would be great." Then I imagined having one of those flutes, and i realized I probably wouldn't like it. You see, I've been playing about 4.5 years and I have a dozen or so flutes. And for the most part, the fingering on them is pretty much the same. Some are a little different in the second octave, but most are the same. But if I had a flute that had an extra hole, or that the normal 6 holes were tuned differently, then it would really throw me off when I mixed it in with my other flutes. Now, this may be a limitation on my part, but I think others would find a similar experience. When I play a song, I like to be able to play it on all of my flutes and I don't want to have to drastically change my fingering.

Also, what you are really talking about is doing away with the need to half-hole. It took me several months to get reasonably good at half-holing and about a year to master it. Now, I don't even think about it, it just comes naturally. Half-holing is just one of those skills that a good flute player needs to acquire. Let's face it, the NAF is pretty easy to play right off the bat. Learning to half-hole is just "paying our dues."

Now, all of that is not to say that I wouldn't want to hear a flute like the one you describe. I just don't think as a player I would want one. But that could just be laziness on my part, as I wouldn't want to learn the extra fingerings.

Peace,
Jeremy



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Gerard   


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Post #11

yes all flutes are different. But it is amazing what you sometimes can find with some cross-fingering... The journey to get to know your flutes seems never ending.


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