Forum Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Flutes Billy(crowbeak) Faluski
The Flute Portal Forums > Native American Flute > NAF General Discussion
marc

hello

any of you have or know flutes with warble by "Billy (Crowbeak) Faluski"?
is that I found very interesting is the video that I put here


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aoeF_KWsVI


thanks
Rick McDaniel
I have only one flute from him......it is a nice little high C# bird beak flute. It is a pretty flute that plays well, but it has no significant warbling characteristics.

I have no other flutes from him, as I have not had occasion to be able to try his flutes, and make a real evaluation of them. I acquired this one, through a dealer, on line.

I hope to see him sometime in the future, at the Sunwatch Festival, which is one where he does vend.
Utah Chris
I have a Billy Crowbeak but it does not warble.

Do you know Tim Blueflint's flutes? His flutes almost always warble throughout their range. They're expensive but there's starting to be a secondary market for his flutes.
marc
ok,thanks

but these warble by billy is real,yes?
Utah Chris
I don't know. I've played around three Crowbeaks and none of them warble, and I've never heard of a Crowbeak warbling. I've been playing and collecting flutes for nearly ten years now.

That's all I know. . . . smile.gif

QUOTE(marc @ Nov 21 2013, 08:21 AM) *
ok,thanks

but these warble by billy is real,yes?

Rick McDaniel
The main flutes that warble, that I have seen, were made by Doc Payne, Oliver Jones, Sonny Nevaquaya, and replicas of Doc Payne's flutes (Toubat.)

While I have seen a few others that would warble, I haven't seen any consistency from others, that would indicate a true effort to make flutes specifically in that way. (I haven't had the opportunity to see Tim Blueflint.)

It was a feature of the Comanche style flute, and Doc Payne was a close friend, of Doc Tate Nevaquaya, and of course, his son, Sonny, also made his flutes in that tradition. (Sonny has one CD I am aware of.) While I never knew Doc Tate, I have met and listened to Sonny, and his flutes are as good a warble as is out there......but for me.......that is absolutely an acquired taste.

I had one of the replicas of Doc Payne's Toubat flutes........but I just didn't enjoy the sound, so I ended up trading it. I can listen to other players, better than I can deal with the sound when I play that type of flute, myself. Like other certain flutes, you can get flutes that just bother you, as a player, which do not bother you, when someone else plays them. Just one of the curious aspects of playing flutes.

If you haven't actually tried playing a flute of that style, you may not know whether you will like playing one. I don't know if Oliver Jones still has any flutes for sale or not. I suspect he has gone at least into semi-retirement, from flute making, as he is up in years, and I haven't seen or heard much from him in recent years. Also don't know if Sonny is still offering flutes for sale. He did at one time, but again, I haven't seen a lot of activity from him in recent years.

Some of the makers are getting older, and they are beginning to either cut back, or retire altogether. Oregon Flute Store used to have a Toubat replica, as well as Russ Wolf, but whether either still offers them, I don't know. (Those were diatonic tuned.)
gregshaku
I have a question about warbling. My ancient territories flute in E warbles but you have to blow hard. It starts to warble right before it would go into the second octave. Does this constitute what you guys are talking about.
Rick McDaniel
No.......that type of warble, is actually not considered to be a warbling flute. It often is simply a result of a slightly unstable fundamental. While you might find that a neat situation, it was not necessarily by intent. You will see that in flutes pretty frequently, though.
gregshaku
Thanks. This is my first flute so warbling is completely new to me.
gregshaku
QUOTE(Rick McDaniel @ Nov 21 2013, 09:09 AM) *
The main flutes that warble, that I have seen, were made by Doc Payne, Oliver Jones, Sonny Nevaquaya, and replicas of Doc Payne's flutes (Toubat.)

While I have seen a few others that would warble, I haven't seen any consistency from others, that would indicate a true effort to make flutes specifically in that way. (I haven't had the opportunity to see Tim Blueflint.)

It was a feature of the Comanche style flute, and Doc Payne was a close friend, of Doc Tate Nevaquaya, and of course, his son, Sonny, also made his flutes in that tradition. (Sonny has one CD I am aware of.) While I never knew Doc Tate, I have met and listened to Sonny, and his flutes are as good a warble as is out there......but for me.......that is absolutely an acquired taste.

I had one of the replicas of Doc Payne's Toubat flutes........but I just didn't enjoy the sound, so I ended up trading it. I can listen to other players, better than I can deal with the sound when I play that type of flute, myself. Like other certain flutes, you can get flutes that just bother you, as a player, which do not bother you, when someone else plays them. Just one of the curious aspects of playing flutes.

If you haven't actually tried playing a flute of that style, you may not know whether you will like playing one. I don't know if Oliver Jones still has any flutes for sale or not. I suspect he has gone at least into semi-retirement, from flute making, as he is up in years, and I haven't seen or heard much from him in recent years. Also don't know if Sonny is still offering flutes for sale. He did at one time, but again, I haven't seen a lot of activity from him in recent years.

Some of the makers are getting older, and they are beginning to either cut back, or retire altogether. Oregon Flute Store used to have a Toubat replica, as well as Russ Wolf, but whether either still offers them, I don't know. (Those were diatonic tuned.)

I could see how a constant warble could be annoying. It would be nice to have one that could warble on demand not all the time.I like to put my vibrato in a piece when I want to.
Mike
QUOTE(Rick McDaniel @ Nov 22 2013, 05:44 AM) *
No.......that type of warble, is actually not considered to be a warbling flute. It often is simply a result of a slightly unstable fundamental. While you might find that a neat situation, it was not necessarily by intent. You will see that in flutes pretty frequently, though.

Sorry, but I have to disagree--unless you are talking about flutes designed to warble vs. flutes that we're not specifically designed to warble but still doing. Warblers are usually set up so that they warble when they are pushed. Either way, when the instability in the fundamental occurs and the pitch jumps up and down at a few Hz and you can hold it there, the flute is warbling. When you listen to the Billy Crowbeak recording, he is pushing the flute to get it to warble.

Mike
Rick McDaniel
You are entitled to disagree........as long as I can keep my own viewpoint. biggrin.gif
MonoLoco
I have several flutes that might warble a bit, if they feel like it ... or, they can be set up to warble on their fundamental, at the expense of tonal quality for the other notes ... but it's an unpredictable type of warble, at best. They were not marketed as warblers and they can only be coaxed into warbling with very careful block placement and a breath pressure that's "just right".

I have one good warbler from Michael Searching Bear. I tried four of his "warblers". The one I kept has a strong, reliable/predictable warble on the fundamental when pushed. Played gently, its fundamental is stable and in tune. The other samples warbled a bit, but not well ... I'd say they had a "slight warble", or weak warble ... at least when compared to the other one. I enjoy playing my warbler in public, just to demonstrate that aggressive style ... but only for one song, or maybe a couple. It does not agree with everyone, for sure. My wife finds it quite irritating, actually.

If a flute can be made to warble on it's fundamental whenever the player wishes it so, then I would call it a good warbling flute ... or, a flute with a warble ... whatever. I would say that's a good thing. If, on the other hand, a flute tends to warble when the player does not wish it so, I would say that's a bad thing ... and, from my experience, often remedied by sliding the block south a tad and exercising restraint with breath control (or dulling the splitting edge a bit).
gregshaku
So, My flute could be considered a warbler. This is my first flute so I have not been able to push any other flute to see if it does the same thing.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.